NAACP’s Dolezal No Fraud: Black like Me

HER CRIME? LOOKING BLACK WHILE NOT EMBRACING HER PROPER WHITENESS.

But identifying as Black as Black in our society is apparently so outrageous that we’ll ignore truly important stories, like the international impotence is helping innumerable desperate refuges caught between ISIS and unsympathetic Turkish soldiers, or that scientists discovered that climate change is accelerating, of that TPP is still a blade hanging over the necks of millions of US workers. It certainly stopped discussion on the imbalance police violence rendered against the Black community; at least in the status quo media. Still, the Dolezal issue persists in the Afterschool Special we once called a nation.

There is far more to Ms. Dolezal, that I am not going to cover here. All of it supports a lifetime of closeness and parity with Black members of this society. This is not so much a defense of Dolezal as an effort to highlight how much of a distraction this issue is. More than that, for all the white folks in the media fixated upon this who assert they are not racist; the obsessive attention to this story to the detriment of true conversations on minority issues in this country most certainly adheres to the long history of racial division in America. You are what you support. That goes both ways. At least Dolezal’s support attempts to martial resources and attention to rescue a beleaguered part of our American family.

First of all, identifying as Black is nothing new. Anyone who has living in an urban area knows full well there are thousands of people in minority dominated neighborhoods, male and female, who identify as Black, Hispanic or whatever. Sometimes it has to do with security. Often it has to do with identifying with the community you live in, and the community you grow to become comfortable with. I know Asian and Middle eastern youths who identify more readily with communities of color in America than white communities. Guess why that is Pamela Geller and FOX News?

Who did Dolezal hurt? She didn’t sneak her way into the position in Spokane. She was chosen for her advocacy for people of color. Spokane’s NAACP chapter is a patchwork of races and identities.mlk-day3 Most of them support her. The organization as a whole supports her. She didn’t trick the organization into picking her over an authentic Black person. The Press is cherry picking individuals with criticisms of Dolezal within Spokane’s NAACP. I have worked in offices where far more people were adamantly opposed to the type of pizza we were to have for office parties.

Dolezal had 2 children with her Black ex-husband. She was the target of racially based harassment significant enough for her to file police reports in Idaho and Washington. A Swastika was placed on the door of the Human Rights Education Institute where she worked, so apparently the local white supremacists also thought she was Black, or at the very least a race traitor.

Finally: So what? While I understand and sympathize that the best advocates for issues endemic to women of color are women of color, Dolezal is likely as close to that issue as a white woman can hope. As far as her “blackness” or “whiteness,” maybe if more of us in the white community identified as Black, or identified more with our Black neighbors, friends and family we might have stronger more productive and honest conversations on Race. The answers to those questions really have little to do ultimately with race, but rather having the best, most efficient, more just and more productive nation.

But fixate on what one woman wants to call herself, and who she epitomizes and champions. Likely you’ll draw satisfaction when she quits in shame, at which point the race-shepherding media will then fixate on what is wrong with the NAACP that they could have the freedom and internal sovereignty to hire someone like Dolezal. You have faced the true menace to America: Rachel Dolezal and “blackness.” Meantime, Republicans in Congress are slashing the budget of NOAA, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on the heels of a report that man made climate change was accelerating far faster than previously realized. When that hammer comes down race identity won’t matter. Instead we’ll either identify as permaculture subsistence farmers circa 1640, except, that is those remaining Ayn Rand-ian conservatives cannibalizing each other into oblivion on the remote island once known as Texas.


Listen Saturday’s from 11am-1pm to WC Turck, Brian Murray and guests on Chicago’s real alternative media, AM1680, Q4 radio, streaming at www.que4.org.
CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. His new book “A Tragic Fate: is an unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com


The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers. .

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

LIGHTS, CAMERA, REVOLUTION! From Prague to Baltimore

On Saturday’s roundtable (11am-1pm, on Que4 Radio AM1680, www.que4.org) we presented the following question about Freddy Grey, the Baltimore man killed two weeks ago in police custody:

“The University of Florida suspended a fraternity after member of Zeta Beta Tau, which incidentally was a character from the first start trek, shouted insults and spit on disabled veterans and urinated on the American flag. In another story, Rand Paul’s son was stopped for DUI and released, despite being described as visibly intoxicated. Meanwhile Linda Cope, founder of the warrior group “They were urinating off of balconies, vomiting off of balconies. They could see the men and women below were there with the retreat.” she described students spitting on veterans, throwing beer bottles over a balcony and ripping flags off their cars. Local police did respond, but no criminal charges were filed. the fraternity has hired its own independent investigator to find out what happened. Cope said the fraternity has so far been helpful in its response, and that she believes fraternity leaders are doing all they can to help make things right, including making a cash donation to her small, grassroots charity. Meanwhile, two more black men died this week at the hands of police, including Freddie gray, whose spinal cord was nearly severed. Can we believe that the proliferation of video is suddenly cause police to be more aggressive with blacks and minorities, or is this finally proof of what blacks and minorities have been experiencing for many decades?”

An autopsy and the family indicate his spinal cord was 80% severed. When that happened has yet to be precisely determined. Video shows Mr. Grey struggling for control of his lags as police pulled him off the sidewalk after several officers tackled him to the ground. If at this point you are asking WHY he was arrested, then you might also find yourself asking what rape victims did to get raped. Stop it. Focus. It is what is needed here.

The interesting and alarming thing with all the black folks at the station that day was their reaction, or lack of one. From our good friend Michael Donnelly, who was in for the roundtable, to Toni Scott, RN and Yoga therapist, and host of “Creating a Healthier Self” (Saturday’s 6-7pm on Que4 Radio, AM1680 in Chicago), or her two guests, a trauma nurse on Chicago’s south side and a 3rd year resident, they were largely uniform in that reaction. This has been going on for decades.

What it exposes is a level of ambivalence and indifference to human rights abuses long prevalent in the black community. The systemic neglect, and the tiered standards applied to black communities is well established here. But something else is interesting here. I believe that it has even come as a bit of a shock to the black community as well. At the fulcrum of that shock is the revolution in digital technology, and especially the revolutionary availability of cameras now so ubiquitous in society.

From all of those I have spoken to in recent days, the sudden wave of video and images showing police heavy-handed and aggressive, and often fatal, behavior towards minorities, often for minor, manufactured and sometimes invented offenses has validated and confirmed for Blacks what they knew but could never prove. The idea that cameras and police violence erupted simultaneously is absurd. That’s sort of like saying that sex was invented with stag films. This has been a hidden form of terrorism and oppression long decried by the Black community and long ignored by the rest of America.

In 1993, just after the fall of the Berlin Wall I was in Prague, just as they were shaking off their Communist past. On a wall in a working class neighborhood, hastily written in English were deeply prophetic words:

“LIGHTS, CAMERA, REVOLUTION!”

Those words are as true here and now as they were on that wall in 1993. The meaning behind them resonating through to this moment and to the embattled Baltimore streets; The past always finds us.


Listen Saturday’s from 11am-1pm to WC Turck, Brian Murray and guests on Chicago’s real alternative media, AM1680, Q4 radio, streaming at www.que4.org.
CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. His new book “A Tragic Fate: is an unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com


The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Protest and Release of Report on CPD Torture + Police Brutality Protest #ChiCopWatch

Oct 22: ‘We Charge Genocide’ Presents Report on Chicago Police Violence and Hosts Silent Protest on National Day of Action Against Police Brutality
Chicago organizers release report they will present to the UN, exposing
ongoing, pervasive Chicago Police violations of the Convention Against Torture, as well as
call for a protest at the 11th District Police Station, formerly run by disgraced Commander Glenn Evans.

CHICAGO 10/20– On October 22, a national day of action against police brutality, local organizers with We Charge Genocide (WCG) will present a report to the public detailing Chicago Police violence in marginalized communities and against youth of color. The report shows that CPD actions violate the United Nations (UN) Conventions Against Torture. The presentation will take place at 9 am at
Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, 800 S Halsted St, Chicago.

The full report, We Charge Genocide: Police Violence Against Chicago’s Youth of Color, will be available for download on 10/22 at wechargegenocide.org.

9 AM Presentation Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/393181967499789/

Later that day, at 5:30 pm, WCG organizers who will travel to the UN to present the report will be available for interviews before a 6:00 pm silent protest at the 11th District Police Station, at 3151 W Harrison. The 11th District is a hotbed of police brutality. Recently, the Commander of the station, Glenn Evans, was accused of putting his gun into a suspect’s mouth. Brutality lawsuits against Evans alone have cost taxpayers nearly a quarter of a million dollars.

6 PM Protest Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1487848628144241/

In November WCG, will send eight organizers to present a report on Chicago Police violence to the United Nations Committee Against Torture at their 53rd Session in Geneva, Switzerland, during which the U.S. will be under review. With widespread community support, the group raised over $17,500 in less than a month via online fundraiser and a series of fundraising dinners. Because of the generosity of people in Chicago and around the country, WCG has added two additional organizers to the Geneva delegation.

Press Kit with bios, FAQ sheet and images for media use. Please credit We Charge Genocide: http://bit.ly/1okIZQI

We Charge Genocide: Police Violence Against Chicago’s Youth of Color contains data and personal narratives collected by WGC at events, using their online submission form, the #ChiCopWatch hashtag, as well as publicly available resources. The report also includes an infographic, Chicago Police Violence By The Numbers. Key finding include:

• From 2009 to 2013, although Black people comprised only 32.3% of Chicago’s overall population, 75% of police shooting victims were Black. Additionally, in the first six months of 2014, 23 of 27 people shot by the CPD were Black.
• Between 2009 and 2011, 92% of Taser uses involved a Black or Latino target, including 49 youth under the age of 16 (with some as young as 8 years old).
• Black youth accounted for 77% of the arrests of youth in 2011 and 79% in 2012. Latino youth accounted for most of the other arrests, i.e., 18% of these arrests in 2011 and 17% in 2012.
• A brutality complaint is 94% less likely to be sustained in Chicago than in the nation as a whole: Only 0.48% of brutality complaints against the CPD are sustained (as opposed to 8% nationally).
• Between 2002 and 2004, Chicago residents filed 10,149 complaints of excessive force, illegal searches, racial abuse, and false arrests against the CPD. Only 124 of these 10,149 complaints were sustained (1.2%), and a mere 19 cases (0.18%) resulted in any meaningful penalty (a suspension of a week or more).
We Charge Genocide is volunteer-run by Chicago residents concerned that the epidemic of police violence continues uninterrupted in Chicago and who seek to equip individuals across the city with tools to more proactively hold police accountable. The name We Charge Genocide comes from a petition filed to the United Nations in 1951, which documented 153 racial killings and other human rights abuses, mostly by the police.

Contact: Page May, 802-324-7751, wechargegenocide@gmail.com
Monica Trinidad, 312-771-6269, mtrini2@gmail.com

October 22 – National Day of Action Against Police Brutality
9AM – Presentation of Report on CPD Violence, 800 S Halsted
5:30 PM – Press Availability with WCG Organizers, 3151 W Harrison
6:00 PM – Silent Protest Against Police Brutality, 3151 W Harrison

Previous press releases:

9/23: We Charge Genocide Raises Over $10,000 in a Week to Present Report on Chicago Police Violence to United Nations Committee Against Torture in Geneva

9/15: We Charge Genocide To Present Report on Chicago Police to the United Nations Committee Against Torture in Geneva


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

How to Crush Ebola in 90 days.

America at the crossroads. We’ll all be bloody puss by Christmas. The nation will be a virtual ghost town. The airlines devastated. no one will flock to the latest Pixar film for fear of catching or spreading the scourge. That, of course is the panic scenario being pushed very(suspiciously) hard by the rightwing corporate media. But for get science, vaccines, the doctors and the CDC. I know the way to crush Ebola in just three months. And for all the capitalists out there, this has a free market solution.

Ha, you say!. Ebola has already double the number of victims in America. 2. The government is at a loss on stemming the tidal wave of terror flooding into America, carried by those ever more dangerous brown foreign people. Close the borders. Everyone from outside, with an accent, a tint to their complexion and something other than standard GAP or Banana Republic attire MUST BE QUARANTINED!

But wait. If you really want to destroy Ebola, make it popular with blond white upper middle class teenage white girls. Tell them it is the ultimate weight loss plan, but with a side-effect. Put the virus on Coke cans, sell happy meals at McDonalds with Ebola collectibles and have Disney put on the “Ebola” show, ala Saved by the Bell, with a Screech-type character curiously shaped like the virus. Get the virus hooked on over the counter painkillers and booze and give it its own reality series on Bravo. In an interview the now born again virus will invariably make anti-gay statements, be drummed off television, lose its sponsorships and fall out of favor with teen age girls. Done. Gone, until it returns briefly in an MTV where are they now segment…

You are welcome.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Obama’s “I have a Yawn” Speech

Full transcript of Obama’s speech.

obama-yawns-570-550x362
Really? The first Black president in America’s history, speaking on the 50th anniversary of the historic Civil Rights march on Washington delivers a speech characterized by a notable lack of energy and perhaps interest. And given the record of this nation, and the revival of institutionalized, statistically-excused, and even overt racism, this speech might have been a rallying call to the work yet to be done, and the progress imperiled.

In glaring monotone, one could almost make the case that his words were weighted with the guilt of supporting a system marked by injustice and the deepening, systemic inequality supposedly eschewed in the very founding documents of our nation. Perhaps that is a natural arc for those who come to issues of race and injustice as more an observer than a victim. Certainly Obama, as he has sincerely indicated, has been the target of racism; but he has also had a more privileged perspective by virtue of a mixed race and opportunities in life not afforded to many in the African American community are still burdened with today.

At times the President seemed to come alive, finding moments of realization about the struggle continuing among too many in the minority communities of this nation. There was none of the noble and resistant exaltation of King’s speech on that spot 50 years earlier. There was no accounting of the progress or lack of progress of the dream King heralded and demanded. Instead, in a rambling and rarely evocative late-term speech that did little to celebrate the anniversary, nor decry injustices yet to be corrected Obama still seemed to stand more on policy than purpose.

We have entered a new era in race relations, but one that could hardly be described as post-racial. Instead there are those who would learn from the past to sharpen and polish their racism and racially divisive attitudes. They argue with the deepest sincerity using statistics to validate horribly racist policies such as stop and frisk law, racial profiling and crime as a means of evading the larger culture’s complicity, abandonment and responsibility in issues directly impacting, impeding and damaging the black community.

Pound the lectern, Mr. President. Rage at those injustices because that is what is needed. You are a leader whose responsibility is to lead this nation. But you are also a black man, and your/our-brothers and sisters remain in bondage as deeply as they did on that August day in 1963 when an unassuming reverend responded to a call to tell us about “the dream.” Can we rightly say that dream has been fulfilled or realized as schools close, black neighborhoods bear the brunt of economic downturns first and more acutely, and when guns from a white dominated gun industry magically proliferate among black neighborhoods due to lack of adequate and reasonable policy?

This nation still blames the symptoms of racial and economic inequality and injustice while lauding the cancer of greed and racism.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post