Risking Everything for Love, 20 years ago today…

An excerpt from the memoir by WC Turck, Everything for Love, available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.com:

I had one last chance, and it was a long shot. In fact, it was unlikely to work out the way I hoped, but what choice did I have? If it failed I knew that I would lose Ana forever.
I barged into the marriage bureau startling the women there. One of them screamed and hurried to find a guard. The others could do little more that protest feebly as I went to the cabinet and pulled out the marriage file on the British journalists. In an instant I had it open and had my journal out.
“You must leave here or we will have you arrested,” one woman complained. I ignored her and quickly copied the citizenship document.
“One document can say both things?” I asked. The blond-haired woman nodded. Johnson at the embassy had already said that I could get the citizenship paper. That was the easy part. Near the center of the page I inserted the line, “In so far as this embassy is aware Mr. Turck is not married.” Nothing about the statement was untrue. I wasn’t married, and the embassy had no idea one way or another. It was a long shot, but it was all that I had.
There was shooting in the plaza again. In fact there was a lot of shooting, but there was no time to worry about it now. I had to get back to the embassy no matter what, but as I stepped from the bombed-out storefront two bullets struck the wall beside my head. I dove headfirst back through the window and crawled up against the wall.
“Shit!” I exclaimed, my frightened breaths exploding in the empty shop.
Every heartbeat thundered in my ears. I laughed, realizing how close I’d come to being killed. Fear was a weight I could ill afford, that is if I really wanted to be with Ana, but it was a weight that kept me from moving for some time. I fought it and threw myself into the open, letting blind momentum decide my fate. I was immediately at a dead run. Ahead of me, past the hotel and a Ukrainian APC on the road, death stalked from a thousand empty windows. A rifle shot thundered in the plaza. I shouted and strained to cover the last few yards before collapsing against the back of the hotel.
It was dark and cool inside the hotel. The place was empty, as usual. A few journalists kept to the shadows and relative safety of a small bar at the back of the cavernous lobby. Bosnian snipers were firing across the river into Grbavica now. The gunfire reverberated with muffled, hollow reports, like the dull throbbing of a kettledrum.
I hated it there. The hotel was a monument to the hypocrisy of war. The Serbs left the place more or less alone, despite that nearly every other building in and around the plaza had been destroyed or heavily damaged. The upper floors were gutted, and the Serbs took occasional pot shots at the front of the building to rattle and warn the foreign Press and diplomats who stayed there.
The Holiday Inn had always had something of an unsavory reputation. The squat yellow and peach building looked as if it had been dropped by accident among some of Sarajevo’s best known and most beautiful architecture. There were rumors that the owners had made some arrangement with the Serbs and local mafia. The relatively cosmetic damage to the place only tended to bolster its nefarious reputation.
The American delegation to Bosnia was on the third floor. It was called an embassy, but only in the loosest possible terms. Next door to the embassy the Newsweek correspondent, a rather miserable looking fellow, was working on a story. A Bosnian guard slept in a chair in front of the embassy. A fully loaded assault rifle threatened to spill from his lap. I quietly slipped past the guard into the embassy, surprising several intelligence officers who scattered quickly as I entered. A tall blond diplomat stepped forward, blocking me until they were gone.
“Dave Johnson(not his real name), First Secretary.” he said with all the sincerity of a used car salesman. He listened impatiently to my story. “So, you’re getting married. Fantastic! That’s just great. No problem, we can give you whatever you need.”
Johnson gave the paper a quick review and nodded.
“I’m sure this will be fine,” he said. “We’ll type it up. Why don’t you come back in the morning?”
“Dave,” I said at the door, “do me a favor and get an office in a better neighborhood. Every time I come here I get shot at. I’m starting to get a bad impression of Sarajevo!”
There was a woman I knew in the lobby. Her name was Fahira, an impeccably dressed business-like woman in her mid forties. Her reddish blond hair was flawless, and held in place by copious amounts of hairspray, that must have cost her a fortune to attain through the black market. Fahira was sitting before one of the hotel’s tall windows staring out at the desolation of her city. She was there most days, hoping to make money as a translator, but no one cared about Bosnian much anymore. I sat down beside her, and knew better than to ask her how business was. She hadn’t worked in many months and was growing more discouraged by the day.
“I thought you might have gone by now,” she said, without looking at me.
“Soon, I hope.” I said nothing of Ana.
“I think the war is lost.” She said dully. I didn’t reply. “When the world no longer cares what happens here, when the Chetniks know the world is looking the other way they will come and slaughter us.”
I let the topic go. I was in no mood for politics.
“How is your daughter?”
“She asks for things. What do I tell her?” Fahira pulled a pack of cigarettes from her purse. She counted them and thought better of having one. She put them away and huffed. “I think that I have ruined her. When everyone else was starving, I could still afford food. We always had money, you know? Now we have no food, nothing. I almost wish that something terrible would happen, then perhaps someone will come and I will make a little money for her.”
I sat with her a while longer, though we didn’t say much. She did most of the talking. I stood and looked out into the plaza. The sun was setting and I didn’t want Ana to worry.
“Well,” I said, not looking at her, “good luck to you.” Fahira nodded slightly and looked off across the plaza.
Rain came that evening, falling over the city as a soft sigh that grew to a gentle whisper. By the time Ana and I left for Nadja and Hasan’s it was pouring. It was a cold autumn rain, that danced upon tiled rooftops and gurgled into failing and overburdened gutters…


The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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American Muslims Protest the Death Sentence of Shiite Cleric. “Free Sheikh Nimr” Demonstration, Sunday, July 26, 2014″

Ali Hasan (612-730-0000)
Rehan Rizvi (312-823-7515)
Haider Hasan (630-362-4609)

ELMHURST, IL [October 26th, 2014]: UNITED FOR NIMR, a grass root group, invites you to attend the event being held in Elmhurst, IL to stop the death sentence of Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr in Saudi Arabia. This demonstration is part of a global effort to repeal the death sentence ruling.

A death sentence was passed on October 15, 2014 against a dissident Shiite Muslim Cleric, Sheikh Nimr, in Saudi Arabia after a deeply flawed trial. Sheikh Nimr was detained in July 2012 after demonstrations held in connection with the Arab Spring. The death sentence against Sheikh Nimr is part of a campaign by the authorities in Saudi Arabia to crush all dissent, including those defending the rights of the Kingdom’s Shiite Muslim community.

Members of the Shiite community have been arrested, imprisoned and harassed for holding collective prayer meetings, celebrating Shiite religious festivals and for breaching restrictions on building mosques and religious schools. Both National and International news media organizations have reported on the death sentence of Sheikh Nimr: FOX News, ABC News, The Guardian, BBC, Russian TV, and Press TV. Amnesty international stated that the death sentence was “Appalling and must be immediately quashed.”

We are gathering at the North West Corner of North Avenue and Kingery Hwy (Rt. 83), Elmhurst, IL, between the hours of 12:00 PM and 1:30 PM on Sunday, October 26th, 2014 to protest the death sentence declared by the Saudi Government. We deem this as a violation of Human Rights and the right to Freedom of Speech. We request your presence and coverage of this event.


The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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Saying Goodye in Sarajevo’s Bombed-out National Library, an excerpt from Everything for Love, a memoir

“This is such a sad place,” said Ana.
She paused at the rubble-strewn steps of the National Library. The city was silent, lulled into a somber peace by a low shroud of funeral gray clouds. They made the archways and galleries of the bombed-out library as deep and mysterious as a cave. There was a stillness to the valley, a muddled quality that left the world distant and out of focus, like an old photograph.
There was a sentry at the corner with a Kalashnikov slung over one shoulder. He looked like a guy from the neighborhood. He watched us curiously for a moment before turning away from the dust thrown up by a passing tank. Ana climbed the steps slowly and went inside without a word. I found her in the shadowy rotunda. Her eyes were closed, face turned upwards to the lattice of the broken ceiling.
I paused beneath an archway, not wishing to disturb such an intimate moment. The air was heavy with the scent of burnt and rotting books. Their ashes lay in heaps among the oriental arches and terraces. Serb shells had shattered many of the massive marble columns and a great pile of rubble stood in the center of the rotunda. High above the thundering wing beats of pigeons disturbed the moment. Ana looked at me, her expression weighted by something.
“Will you tell me now?’ she pleaded. All morning I had teased her about a surprise.
“Let me take a picture of you first.”
“Then you will tell me?”
“Maybe,” I laughed.
“I hate you,” she pouted.
“Be that as it may,” I snapped a picture of her, “but I still won’t tell you.”
“Pease, Bill, don’t be so cruel!”
The more insistent she became the more obstinate I became. Not that the surprise was so great. Rather it was more a gift of hope, a way of making the distance between us a little less painful. Ana danced across the rotunda, framed like an angel in the lens of my camera.
“Did you come to this place before the war?” I asked.
“Oh, it was such a beautiful place. It was, it was like walking into someone’s soul, or the soul of humanity. Ideas, truth and history called from every corner, begging them to take their secrets into your heart. There was a huge painting over there, and books there and there and there. I would often sit in those galleries, sometimes reading, sometimes just looking out at the river and mountains.”
Ana turned suddenly and did her best to feigned anger. “Bill, I really must tell you that I hate surprises. Do you really wish for me to hate you?”
“Nice try.” I snapped another photo.
“Why do you torture me so? I swear I will never speak to you again.” She found it impossible to keep from smiling.
“You’re like a child!”
“Oh no, I can be much worse.”
I lowered the camera and went to her. “Ana, do you believe in Christmas miracles?”
“Bill,” she protested, “don’t play games.”
“I left some money with Nadja and Hasan. Not much, but it should be enough for something on Christmas.” Tears welled in her eyes. Ana held me tight.
“I love you so much,” she whispered.
“You have come to mean so much to me,” I said. “Leaving you behind, it will soothe my broken heart to know that I made you smile one last time. Just remember me, okay?”
“I will remember you, I promise.” She kissed my neck. Her tears were wet and cool.
We climbed down from the library into the gray blue cityscape. Gunfire echoed as we walked home along the river. A crowd waited for a tram near the Princip Bridge, spread out along the wall should a shell land among them. From Marin Dvor came the fevered wail of an ambulance. A convoy passed an argument in a window. Numbed and shell-shocked soldiers wandered empty streets, as bitter and aimless as the roaming dogs long ago abandoned by destitute owners. A young man missing a leg hobbled along an alley to an uncertain future. Children were being born blocks from the line where men were dying. Young boys and girls learned the thrill and pain of first love, while a Gypsy family lived out of a storefront and cooked over an open flame. A crazy man ran naked down the street. A parent learned of their son’s death, while a couple made love next door. All of this in a world barely one by three miles long. Ana hugged me close and said that she felt like Robinson Crusoe.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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New Poll Reveals Overwhelming Majority of Doctors Concerned About Antibiotics Use on Healthy Animals

What: Illinois PIRG, Consumers Union and local Northwestern and U of Chicago doctors will release a new Consumer Reports poll that points to overwhelming concern from doctors around the common meat industry practice of feeding antibiotics to healthy animals.

Where: Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital
First Floor
225 E. Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611
– Media can enter on the Superior St. entrance

When: 10:00 AM
Thursday, October 23, 2014

Who:
1. Sameer Patel, MD MPH
Lurie Children’s Hospital Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Director
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Assistant Professor

2. Susan Boyle-Vavra, PhD
University of Chicago MRSA Research Center, Director
Associate Professor, University of Chicago

3. Michael Hansen, PhD
Senior Staff Scientist, Consumers Union

4. Dev Gowda, JD
Campaign Director, Illinois PIRG’s End the Misuse of Antibiotics Campaign

Visuals: Local doctors in white coats; petition signatures of 7,000 health professionals to Obama administration

Contact:
Dev Gowda, Illinois Public Interest Research Group (PIRG); 630-915-6025 (cell); dev@illinoispirg.org
Naomi Starkman, Consumers Union; 917-539-3924 (cell); nstarkman.consultant@consumer.org

###

Illinois Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) is a statewide consumer group that stands up to powerful interests whenever they threaten our health and safety, our financial security or our right to fully participate in our democratic society.


The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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Waukegan Teacher’s Strike News, courtesy Fred Klonsky. Thank you!!!

Fred Klonsky can also be found at his blog and website: http://preaprez.wordpress.com/author/preaprez/

Thank you friends, for supporting an amazing online protest in support of Waukegan teachers:

Waukegan, an hour north of Chicago, got hit by a storm last night.
Starting at about 7PM and lasting until past 9PM, tens of thousands of people went on Twitter to announce their support for Waukegan teachers. They are on strike for a third week.
Kenzo Shibata of the Illinois Federation of Teachers posted the results last night on Facebook.
Including a Tweet from rocker Tom Morello who comes from Lake County where Waukegan is located.screen-shot-2014-10-21-at-8-00-24-am

In Other Waukegan Strike News:

A communication from the Waukegan board president:

I have not received an email from you, the vast number of petitions have knocked many emails out of the inbox. I do apologize!

First, let me say that no one wants our students out of school. The Board is committed to reaching a fair agreement and getting our students back into the classroom. I personally do not understand the community’s hostility towards the BOE, when we are simply trying to do what is best for students, taxpayers and teachers (who just received raises in May 2014, retroactive to July 2013 when the Union threatened to strike on April 16). If the community wants to cripple our School District…

I cannot speak to what the Teachers Union is feeling at this point. As you know we have been negotiating in good faith with the Union. We were as surprised as everyone when the Union told us they were walking away from the table. Recently, we have made progress on a number of issues, including healthcare, duration of school year and employment conditions. Including conceding to full release time for the Union President at $90,000 with no teaching duties. The remaining issue is yearly salary increases. We want a fair contract, but it cannot come at the expense of all the other investments we must make to sustain educational quality in our schools.

In regards to the Board using expert negotiators to represent it in the mediation sessions, we believe this is the best course because they represent the school system without emotions. The collective bargaining process requires objectivity, which our representatives have. We never thought the Union would take this drastic measure to interrupt student’s education. Further, all expenses are paid out of the Ed. Fund. I not sure what the issue is. We requested a 2 week postponement to the strike, in order for talks to happen while students were in school, they refused!

Speaking for myself, I have been running children programs in Waukegan for 30 years. I am passionate about theses issues. It saddens me that individuals that don’t know me, can name call, defame me as uncaring, even stupid, when my life’s work has been for children. Whether on the BOE or not I will continue to what I have been called to do, work on behalf of children and my hometown.

Please know we are doing everything we can without sacrificing our school system’s future. We cannot negotiate with ourselves. We hope that dedicated residents, such as yourself, will help us bring the Teachers back to the table so we can get our students back in class.

God bless you

Anita Hanna

The vast number of petitions Anita Hanna is referring to is the Moveon petition demanding the Board come to the table.

She mentions that she doesn’t understand the community’s hostility towards her.

Perhaps she is not listening to the vast numbers who signed the petition.

Hanna is totally confused about her proposals.

The union is quoted about the proposals in an article in the News Sun.

“The Board has said that we have settled on the issue of health insurance and that’s incorrect.” (union spokesmen Kenzo) Shibata said.

A proposal that would have the Board continue to pay 100 percent for single coverage insurance has a salary increase percentage that the Union has not agreed to.

Another proposal from the District offers a bigger salary raise but would have the teachers pay a percentage into their insurance coverage. The union has also not agreed to that.

Shibata said that conflicting proposals are confusing and that’s why the negotiating teams and leaders will continue to hit the streets and go door-to-door explaining the issues to those who want to listen.

Hanna admits that the $275 per hour that the board is handing over to the lawyer who is bargaining on the board’s behalf is paid for out of the district Education Fund.

The Education Fund is where teacher salaries come from.

But Hanna doesn’t see what the issue is?

And:

Background….In an effort to give the board time to review our latest counter proposal, we emailed them yesterday at 3:15pm in anticipation of them being prepared for today’s meeting.

Today was scheduled to begin at 9am, the district remained in caucus until 11:09am when they finally presented their counter proposal.

The union caucused at 11:21am and returned to the negotiations room at 11:40am to find the entire district team had left for lunch and was not prepared to receive the counter.

As neither the union, nor the federal mediator was not notified, it is uncertain as to the time they will return. At any rate we are ready and waiting on them.

The team finds it alarming that they are more concerned with running out for lunch, than negotiating.

The district attorney claims “simple miscommunication” we ask how many simple “miscommunications” can there be during such an important time.

Teresa ‘T’ Hansen: How rude! They should have ordered Jimmy Johns Box Lunches for everyone and worked through lunch! #Waukegannegotiationsteamhungry
Like · Reply · 4 · 28 minutes ago

Dorothy Joyce: Do they even care about the kids?. I know the teachers but does the boardreally even wonder about them?
Like · Reply · 1 · 11 minutes ago

Lin Waggener: SMH!!! They never cease to amaze me. Hang in there! #waukeganstrong
Like · Reply · 1 · 17 minutes ago

Bud Hicks: Don’t take the bait. Keep calm.
Like · Reply · 1 · 21 minutes ago

Jenny Alexander: Wow this is incredibly frustrating, I am so sorry they are behaving this way. I’m in Chicago in full solidarity
Like · Reply · 1 · 29 minutes ago

Tom Tavernier: Stay strong teachers.
Like · Reply · 2 minutes ago

Dana Gothelf-Lerner: They obviously want this dragged out.
Like · Reply · 25 minutes ago

Gabriela Bustamante: In good faith???? Waukegan slapped again.
Like · Reply ·


The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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Clean Up Your Mess, CPS: New Report Released As Community Protests Against School Conditions Intensify

Chicago Light Brigade report accuses Chicago Public Schools, the Department of Public Health and Alderman Moore of failing to inform parents of dangerous school conditions and allowing hazards to continue unaddressed for nearly 1,000 school days.

Press Conference & Protest at Gale Elementary
Wednesday, 10/22/2014, 9:00am
Chicago Public Schools Headquarters
125 S Clark St, Chicago, IL 60603

CHICAGO 10/21/14 – Amid growing complaints unsanitary conditions and inadequate maintenance in Chicago’s public schools, Chicago Light Brigade (CLB) has released a report stating Chicago Public Schools (CPS) administrators, over a period of at least five years, knowingly exposed up to two thousand, mostly low income Rogers Park children to significant amounts of peeling lead based paint and lead based paint dust at Gale Math and Science Academy. The group is holding a press conference and protest Wednesday at CPS headquarters to debut their report, present recommendations and raise awareness of the unacceptable conditions that were allowed to develop at Gale.

Lead is an extraordinarily dangerous poison. Exposure even in small amounts, especially in developing children, can cause irreversible brain damage. Children in buildings with flaking lead paint are also exposed to lead dust, which is spread by hand and transferred on clothes by children to their homes. A 2012 Chicago Reader article sums up the acute nature of this hazard: “It doesn’t take much: a sugar packet’s worth of lead dust scattered over an area the size of a football field is enough to poison a child.”

The report charges that CPS withheld information from Gale administrators and parents about hazards at their school and illegally refused to comply with Freedom of Information Requests filed by CLB activists until attorneys intervened, prompting action from Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s office. It also states that the Chicago Department of Public Health and Ald Joe Moore (49) have each contributed to keeping parents in the dark about lead hazards at the school.” Again, this is consistent with the latest version..

According to internal CPS documents acquired by CLB, testing for lead at the school was first performed in 2009. Despite results showing hazards in public areas used by all students, no action was taken by CPS and parents were not informed of the health risks associated with exposure to lead based paint. In August of 2013 a second round of tests revealed lead-based paint hazards at fifteen locations in the school, and nine out of ten tested classrooms. Again, no action was taken, parents were not informed, and students and staff continued to be exposed every day they were in the building.

Following years of repeated requests for action by Gale administrators, CLB began a campaign to force CPS to take action to remove lead hazards and make other repairs to the school, including faulty fire alarms and leaking roofs. Although Alderman Moore denied knowledge of the issue, Moore’s staffers attended LSC meetings where ongoing maintenance issues were discussed.

Once the media began reporting on hazards at Gale, a new round of testing was secretly performed by CPS which proved widespread lead contamination throughout the facility. According to CPS documents, lead based paint was found in multiple classrooms, offices, and hallways as well as on entry doors, railings and post caps in the stairwells – surface areas which are touched by children’s hands everyday.

Because of CPS’ inaction and the subsequent cover up by administrators and Alderman Moore, lead based paint hazards at Gale were allowed to continue unabated for almost one thousand school days. In light of these facts, it is likely that CPS management of lead based paint across its entire system is deeply flawed.

While pressure from CLB and other community members has resulted in long overdue lead remediation efforts at Gale, CLB’s findings have a number of community members asking what else CPS might be hiding. “It’s a story you’ll hear from everyone who tries to track down information about a school: CPS just doesn’t respond to FOIA requests, unless they’re forced to. They don’t want to tell us what they knew, when they knew it, or what other schools might contain hazards. They’re supposed to have lead reports for these schools on file, and we want to see them,” said local organizer Kelly Hayes.

Other community members believe that a lack of accountability is the root problem. “If CPS can find $10 million to spend on new office furniture, they can find the money to lead test our public schools and make that information public. The problem is that they’re not accountable. If you want them to be accountable, they need to be elected, not appointed. Until then, the paint’s going to keep peeling, and the rats and roaches aren’t going anywhere.” said Chicago teacher Jerica Jurado.

CLB makes a series of recommendations in their report, including:

•CPS must locate every individual, parent, or guardian that was present or had children in Gale during the period 2009-2014, and inform them of possible exposure to lead based paint and lead based paint dust.
•An independent investigation, by medically trained personnel not employed or connected to CPS, CDPH, or other non- federal governmental bodies in the State of Illinois should be undertaken into management of lead based paint at all CPS facilities.
•A formal complaint should be lodged with the United States Environmental Protection Agency- Region 5 regarding CPS management of hazardous lead in all of its facilities.
•An independently administered fund must be created to provide ongoing medical support for families impacted by lead exposure at Gale.
•Because all lead based paint is at least thirty-six years old, exposed paint at all CPS locations must be considered a hazard and abated as soon as possible.
•Enrollment based funding cuts to Gale must be rescinded to restore the school to resource parity with institutions that were not burdened by extreme facilities mismanagement.

Selected Past Media Coverage:

May 13, 2014, CBS Chicago: Residents Want Funds To Fix Gale Math And Science Academy

May 22, 2014, CBS Chicago: Rogers Park School Is Crumbling Around Students, Parents Tell CPS

May 23, 2014, DNAinfo: CPS to Remove Lead Paint From Gale School After Complaints

June 2, 2014, Chicago Tonight: Rogers Park School Struggles to Survive, Embattled Elementary School Determined to be Heard


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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20 Years Ago Today I Asked Bosnian Artist Ana Tosic to Marry me. It Almost Didn’t Happen…

At curfew she walked with me to the end of her street. There was fighting on Igman. We watched flashes across the dark face of the mountain. There was worry in Ana’s face.
“You must leave soon, Bill.”
I studied her face, mulling over a thought. “What if I stayed?”
“Don’t be foolish.”
“I love you, Ana. What if we were meant to…”
She quickly cut me off. “If we were meant to be together we would have met in Chicago or Paris or anywhere but here.”
I sighed heavily and looked again at the mountain. She was right, of course.
“I talked with a friend the other day,” she said. “He works on the tunnel in Dobrinja. He says that if you can get there he will help you across to Butmir.”
“Ana, I…”
“It is very dangerous, but if you have no other choice.”
The time had come, and I decided that night, as I evaded the police on the way to Hasan’s, that I would leaving the following night. Ana’s friend would be at the tunnel and, with a bit of luck, would help me across. I would go to see her in the afternoon to say goodbye. It would be quick, like tearing off a bandage.
The next morning I returned to the military hospital for the letters Alto and Emira had written for their family on the outside. Snipers were dueling in the plaza. The halls of the hospital were crowded with patients and doctors chased there by the gunfire. Above the frustrated curses of staff, protestations and the moans of the sick and wounded, bullets could be heard slapping against the walls of the building, sounding like clapping hands. I found Emira calming patients, but I might have thought I had rescued her. Grabbing my arm she led me quickly up to Alto’s room.
“Terrible,” she said of the shooting, “much worse than I have seen it in some time.”
The Serbs were putting pressure all around the city, attempting to force the Bosnians to divert troops from the mountain offensive.
“Little boys with dangerous toys,” I remarked.
“You will hate me, but I haven’t finished the letter. I simply have not had time, with all the fighting and new patients. We are overwhelmed, you understand. I don’t think that Alto is finished either. I’m sorry, but if you could return tomorrow.”
“I was leaving the city tonight.”
“One more day, if it is not too much of a problem.”
At least I might have one more day with Ana. “No, it’s no problem.”
“It’s funny,” she smiled. “I didn’t know what to write. Is that crazy? After so long I had a million things to say and to know. I could have written a book, but with all this time passed and only a few small pages, what is most important to say? All I could think to say was ‘I love you’ a thousand times.” Emira shrugged and smiled weakly. “So you’re leaving the city.”
“Soon.”
“You don’t sound very happy?”
“I met a girl.” We paused near Alto’s door. The shooting had stopped and he was on his cot working on the letter.
“A girl? That’s fantastic!” Emira exclaimed. “Tell me her name, really you must.”
“Ana.”
“Your Ana is a lucky girl,” she hugged me. “I hope she knows that.”
“If she won’t marry you,” Alto quipped, “I will!”
Emira swatted at him playfully, admonishing him with a sweet smile. “You’re mad! Now finish your letter so this poor man can go home to America.”
“I’m not finished yet,” he said.
“It’s not supposed to be War and Peace!” Emira remarked.
“Just war,” Alto replied.
Two bullets smacked the wall beside the window chasing us into the hall again. Alto hopped around on one foot having abandoned his crutches with the letter in the room. As more gunfire resounded in the plaza below he thought better of returning for either of them.
“Ah, jebim te…!” he swore.
“Relax,” said Emira. “Bill will return tomorrow.” She looked at me, her eyes hungry for every detail of Ana. “So is this serious with your Ana?”
“It was all a mistake, Emira.”
“Real love is never a mistake.”
“I didn’t plan on this. Really, it was never my intention.”
“Did you think that one day you would just wake up and say, this is the day I will fall in love? When you return tomorrow we will have coffee and we will talk more.”
Later that evening Ana and I went to see her grandmother downtown. Ghostly white clouds drifted silently above the dark city and broken rooftops. I said nothing about leaving, and Ana seemed to be in no mood to confront that eventuality either.
Ana’s grandmother Angela lived in a five-story building near Bashcharshija. There were no lights in the stairwell. Tall windows on each landing allowed starlight and offered a magnificent view of Trebevich, but also made us targets for snipers. Angela was expecting us.
She appeared on the landing at her door beckoning us to hurry. She greeted me warmly and ushered us inside. Despite her age and the hardships of the war, Angela remained a lovely and refined woman. I saw not a small amount of her in Ana. They were both proud and mannered almost to a fault. A wool shawl was thrown around her shoulders, and there were hints of silver in her curly dark hair. By candlelight her skin had the luster of fine alabaster.
The apartment was small but inviting and warm. The window in the tiny front room held a stunning view of Trebevich and the frontline. Despite the fact that the walls of the building were peppered with bulletholes, Angela’s windows had miraculously remained intact. The room was kept like a museum, with a beautiful espresso colored loveseat, and an impressive library of Bosnian and Yugoslav literature kept under lock and key behind bevelled glass doors. Opposite the windows and mountain, and easily the centerpiece to this magnificent place, stood a turn-of-the-century Austrian writing table.
The walls were filled with original oil paintings by some of Yugoslavia’s best artists. Among them were lithographs and several sketches of a nude girl I felt sure were of Angela done many years before. The candlelight warmed the dark wood of exquisite Austrian antiques. In glimpses it was almost as if we had stepped into another time. There were keepsakes from around the world, and posters that hinted at Angela’s career as a Yugoslav film producer for movies like “Tito and Me,” “A Time for Gypsies,” and “When father was Away on Business.”
I could feel her studying me as we sipped hot tea. She seemed to scrutinize every word and gesture, as if to gauge some clue to my motives. Ana seemed to notice as well, and seemed terribly worried over her grandmother’s opinion, much as she was with Cico. Years of sizing up opponents in the cutthroat system of the Yugoslav Communist Party had made her adept at identifying and neutralizing threats. For the moment I was a threat to her granddaughter. Despite that, I found that I both admired and feared Angela. As if sensing this, Ana would reach over now and then to touch my knee and let me know that everything was all right.
Angela produced a small plate of palachinka, jam-filled Bosnian crepes. She delighted in watching as Ana and I devoured the entire plate. It was, quite frankly, the only substantive food either of us had eaten in days. Angela had gone to great expense to make them.
She usually kept a very tight, indeed miserly, reign on her finances, which were dwindling steadily as the war continued. In the late Eighties, following the death of Tito, as the Yugoslav Dinar began to crumble, Angela wisely converted much of her cash to German Marks. She knew that the cash starved government and corrupt officials would plunder the state-controlled banks. If war broke out the Dinar would be worthless.
We stayed only a short time. Angela begged us to visit her again. She rarely had visitors any longer, and the cold and war had aggravated her arthritis so that she almost never left the apartment. Neither of us let on that I would be leaving soon. We could hardly bear the thought ourselves. We hurried past the windows on the stairs as tracers spit from trenches on the mountain. Down on the street Ana held me tight.
“How did I do?” I asked.
“You were great. She really liked you. I knew that she would.”
A soldier was waiting in the war room when we returned to Ana’s. He was tall and handsome, with broad shoulders and neatly trimmed blond hair. He was still in uniform and dirty from being on the line. He paced the room while his girlfriend looked on with a concerned expression. She was equally stunning by appearance, imbued with the grace and elegance of a dancer. Long golden hair was pulled tightly from her small face. Their expressions were severe and tense. Ana knew why they were there. She checked to be sure no one was on the stairs and closed the door tight.
“Bill, this is my friend Damir.”
I held out a hand but he ignored it. “What has Ana told you about the tunnel?”
“Nothing.” I shrank from his girlfriend’s icy stare. Her name was Nina. She and Ana had gone to school together, and had trained at the same dance school.
“Did she tell you that I work on the tunnel?”
“She never mentioned any names.” I looked at Ana. Her expression spoke of the danger and seriousness of all this.
“Damir,” Nina scowled, “this is a big mistake.”
He waved her off and thought for a moment. “Normally I would not do this. There is a reason that foreigners are forbidden from the tunnel. If the Chetniks learned the location the war could be lost.” He sighed heavily. “However, because of my friendship with Ana I will help you, if you can get there.”
“You understand that if Damir is caught he could be shot,” said Nina. “Will you carry that on your conscience?” She glared accusingly at Ana.
“I will be at the tunnel Monday and Wednesday night,” Damir went to the door. Nina joined him there. His eyes met mine, as though second-guessing his decision. “Do not tell anyone of this.”
They left quickly, Ana and I languishing in the heaviness of their departure.
“I’m sorry for Nina,” Ana rubbed my chest. “She comes off like a bitch. It’s just that she worries for him terribly.”
I nodded. “Do you trust him?”
She looked so terribly sad as she nodded. I sighed and checked the time. It was nearly curfew.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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Alert Status Delta Red, Threat Con Super Max!!!!!

The weather channel announced today that Chicago is at TorCon One warning status. That is, Chicago has a one in ten chance of having a tornado today. Good god, where will I hide? Have I collected enough emergency disaster meals, stockpiled enough ammunition, and locked and loaded all of my guns. If the Zombies come and attempt to lay a finger on even one of my coveted survival stash of Snickers bars, I swear I’ll, I’ll…

Be honest, how many of you after hearing the news this weekend that the health worker on the cruise ship this weekend had been cleared of Ebola and was allowed to go home breathed a sigh of relief. Not that she didn’t have Ebola, but that the hysterical media-driven stupidity might at last have crested. Limbaugh started his program whipping up hysteria. The morning show on another rightwing station invited an expert in infectious diseases, and then shifted the cogent and even-tempered answers from the expert into a graphic description of how Ebola kills its victims. They ignored the fact that all two current victims but the first victim, Mr. Duncan, who did not receive proper treatment, have survived the disease. The “logic-anchored” right is replete with panic, alarm and hysteria.

Pick an issue. ISIS terrorists are streaming across the Mexican border, left wide open by Obama, to behead Americans carte blanche and wholesale across the fifty states. Hillary Clinton could care less that the ambassador to Libya was butchered over hours and hours while Obama was asleep or golfing. Hispanic children are bringing pandemics across the border, according to Michael Savage, and Ferguson’s unrest means the welfare coloreds are coming to loot your particular gated suburban community. Obama is dividing America by simply talking about race? Huh? Obama, we are told, and which former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh so painfully conceded on his Far Side-type of radio program, is a Muslim, who wants to destroy America. Fear, panic, panic, fear!

We are fed a constant diet of fear and panic in this country, through the media, talk radio and by advertisers. It is the sales tactic of last resort, and they are playing it to the hilt. Specifically they target the elderly and the white middle class, and they respond instinctively. There is a deeply ingrained inclination to pay attention to the alarmist. Likely it helped your neighbor known when a lion was stalking the tribe in the Savannahs of central Africa. But this all began when corporations began gobbling up media in this country until 90% or more, including Facebook is poured through multiple filters.

We are told that crime is rampant in Chicago, with murder and mayhem everywhere. It’s out of control! Joe Walsh was pounding the desk with pretend hysterics over this crisis filler. That is, they need to constantly fill the airwaves with the idea, ahead of an election, that the world is crumbling. Truth is, the murder rate-one is too many- will be lower this year than last year. 357 currently, or about 300 less than the peak under Bush, and to be fair, half of what it was in 1994 under Clinton. Last year it was 415. It was 513 under Bush’s final year in office, but alas, no hysteria..

Limbaugh cited a rightwing poll and was screaming into the microphone about 85% of the American people saying that the country is “going to hell!” The right will cite chapter and verse from so-called experts who for self-aggrandizement, or to kiss the ass of the likes of a Hannity or savage for their 3 minutes on TV or radio to feed their fear narrative, but it is all to keep you controlled and diverted from real truths. Ebola killed one guy in this country who was half dead when the for-profit hospital in Texas followed their corporate guidelines and sent him home. That same media ignores many thousands of true, not-hysterical climate scientists warning of climate change; which has already killed thousands(I’ll send you the list) and has already mired us in wars for oil and water.

Occupy missed their true calling. Instead of occupying parks, they should have occupied the media. Imagine the country we might have had they stormed CBS and FOX, Salem, Clear Channel and the rest and returned the media to the people. You rightwingers out there longing for the good old days, how come that that doesn’t apply to a public media that represents and reflects the people, not the wealthy and powerful? How come that doesn’t mean a media that doesn’t strive to keep us distracted with crisis after crisis, day after day?

Learn more about how the State Policy Network aids ALEC and spins disinformation in the states.

The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.

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#WAUKEGANSTRONG TWITTER STORM, MONDAY FROM 7-9PM

Courtesy Fred Klonsky:

Tomorrow is day 11 of the Waukegan teacher strike.

Waukegan teachers, “It’s not about the money — it’s about respect.”

Letter from Waukegan union president Kathy Schwarz (via Fred Klonsky) http://ow.ly/CZVhm

The Board of Education still has yet to attend one negotiations session and the contract expired on 6/30/14.

On Wednesday, the Union gave the District administrators negotiating the contract a break from negotiations to take the time to regroup, reflect, meet with the Board to come up with a serious proposal to present to the Union. Negotiations have been constantly stalled by the District breaking to ask the Board for permission to sign off on proposals.

The community continues to support the Union, and the Union’s team and rank-and-file members spent the weekend reaching out to churches and community organizations to tell its side of the story. They make a strong coalition that is becoming stronger through this struggle.

Today Waukegan teachers, parents and students march in solidarity to the District office.

Tomorrow night (Monday October 20th), let’s rally online with a social media storm.

From 7-9 PM, tweet your support with the hashtag #WaukeganStrong.

Let’s make this trend and show the world that we support teachers!

Sample Tweets/Facebook posts (feel free to copy/paste into your status or make up your own — just use #WaukeganStrong)

Waukegan stands by its teachers! #WaukeganStrike #WaukeganStrong http://ow.ly/CZW2E
#Waukegan Board of Education – stop hiding behind your $275-an-hour Downtown Chicago lawyer! http://ow.ly/CZW6H #WaukeganStrong
#Waukegan teachers are under attack! What do we do? Stand up, fight back! http://ow.ly/i/7h5ib #WaukeganStrong #WaukeganStrike

Fred Klonsky | October 19, 2014 at 5:42 pm | Categories: Waukegan | URL: http://wp.me/p4C3g-9Wb

Learn more about how the State Policy Network aids ALEC and spins disinformation in the states.

The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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19th National Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality, Repression, and the Criminalization of a Generation

October 22 Wednesday Protest to Stop Police Brutality
12:00 noon Daley Plaza
(Washington & Dearborn)
Rally and March

The 19th annual Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality, Repression, and the Criminalization of a Generation will be erecting a giant stop sign against the whole killer program of police brutality and mass incarceration. This is a day when people from cities and towns across the country http://sites.google.com/site/stopmassincarcerationo22/ – youth from inner city high schools and those who have been pushed out of the school system are joining with college students, parents of those who have been murdered and incarcerated, as well as people of conscience in city centers and in the neighborhoods all over.

The Day of Protest 2014 is unfolding during the first October Month of Resistance to Mass Incarceration, Police Terror, Repression and the Criminalization of a Generation, initiated by Prof. Cornel West and Carl Dix, representative of the Revolutionary Communist Party. Stop Mass Incarceration Network has been in the forefront of taking on the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson Mo., Eric Garner’s murder by police in NYC, and connecting these struggles against police terror across the country with the whole Month of Resistance movement.

“Police in Chicago are at the forefront of the nationwide attack on Black and Brown youth. Among the youth whose lives have recently been stolen by police here in Chicago are: Roshad McIntosh, 19 years old; Warren Robinson, 16 years old; and Pedro Rios, 14 years old. Glenn Evans, who received 50 complaints for police brutality over the last 13 years, was never disciplined and instead highly praised from the highest levels of the CPD and promoted repeatedly up the ranks of the CPD to commander,” said Gregory Koger, ex-prisoner activist in the Chicago chapter of Stop Mass Incarceration Network. “In the face of growing community outrage and protest, Evans was recently indicted for shoving his gun down the throat of 22-year old Rickey Williams, but still has not been fired. On October 22nd, people in Chicago will defiantly stand with others across the country. We will raise our voices and demand: No more Stolen Lives! No more murders by the police! Stop Mass Incarceration Now.!”

The Call for the Month of Resistance is endorsed by families of those killed by police, former prisoners, clergy, academics, and community organizations, and public figures such as Chuck D, who recorded the Pledge of Resistance and Alice Walker, whose poem “Gather,” is dedicated to Carl Dix and Cornel West. Signatories of Call for the Month of Resistance include Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow, Nikki Giovanni, poet, Ted Jennings, Chicago Theological Seminary, Cephus “Uncle Bobby” Johnson, Uncle of Oscar Grant, killed by Bay Area Rapid Transit Police and many more.

Additional Events through the day:

9-11 a.m. Hull House: Public release of UN report on CPD Violence against Youth of Color by www.wechargegenocide.org

6:00 pm Silent Vigil at 11th Police District
3151 W. Harrison

7:00 – 10:p.m. MultiKulti, Cultural Event, Roosevelt University SMIN
1000 N Milwaukee Ave,


Stop Mass Incarceration Network – Chicago
stopmassincarcerationchicago@gmail.com • (312) 933-9586
www.facebook.com/SMINChicago
stopmassincarceration.net

The Stop Mass Incarceration Network is a project of the Alliance for Global Justice, a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. The Stop Mass Incarceration Network is building a movement to stop the injustice of mass incarceration and police brutality; and the racially biased policies and practices of the police, the courts and the U.S. legal system; and to support the rights of prisoners and the formerly incarcerated. We call on all to join us.

Learn more about how the State Policy Network aids ALEC and spins disinformation in the states.

The Illinois Policy Institute (IPI) is a conservative think tank with offices in Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, and member of the State Policy Network. IPI is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011. IPI is also a member of ALEC’s Health and Human Services Task Force and Education Task Force. Senior Budget and Tax Policy Analyst, Amanda Griffin-Johnson, presented model legislation (the “State Employee Health Savings Account Act”) to the HHS task force at ALEC’s 2011 annual meeting.[4] Collin Hitt, Director of Education Policy, is a private sector member of the Education Task Force representing IPI. He sponsored the “Local Government Transparency Act” at the ALEC 2011 States and Nation Policy Summit. In its 2006 annual report the Cato Institute states that it made a grant of $50,000 to the Illinois Policy Institute. The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank founded by Charles G. Koch and funded by the Koch brothers.


CAM00236WC Turck is an author, artist, playwright and talk radio host in Chicago. He has been called the most dangerous voice on the Left. He is currently working on a new book “Shoot Down: An unflinching look at the events leading up to the shooting down of Malaysia Air Flight 17.” His first novel, “Broken” was recommended by NAMI for its treatment of PTSD. In 2006 he published “Everything for Love,” a memoir of his experiences during the siege of Sarajevo. He wrote and produced two critically acclaimed plays, “Occupy my Heart” and “The People’s Republic of Edward Snowden.” He works with the homeless and foreclosure victims in Chicago. He partners in a weekly radio show dedicated to issues, society and politics with cohost, activist and artist Brian Murray For more information, past shows, videos and articles, visit www.revolutioandbeer.com

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